Fragile Creatures, Fierce Friend and Prince Vaseline at the Dome

Gallery

This gallery contains 22 photos.

Brighton Dome’s Spectrum nights put on a monthly collection of new music and are always good value and pretty interesting. Last night we had five bands for five pounds at the Dome Studio Theatre. Kicking off proceedings were the excellent indie … Continue reading

Spectrum’s October showcase at the Dome Studio Theatre

Gallery

This gallery contains 15 photos.

Spectrum in association with Resident records are putting on monthly gig’s of new Brighton music, following on from the long series of similar events they curated with Source magazine. October’s gig at the Dome Studio Theatre featured four bands on … Continue reading

Fear of Men Album Launch / Spectrum at the Dome Studio Theatre

On Tuesday Fear of Men launched their new album Loom with a gig at the Dome Studio Theatre. Loom is out this monday, but if that’s too long to wait, you can buy the limited edition coloured vinyl edition as a Record Store Day exclusive tomorrow. If even that’s too long, it’s currently streaming on Pitchfork.

The launch gig was the first of a new set of regular nights at the Dome called Spectrum, put on in collaboration with Resident Support on the night came from Grace Carter, Grasshopper and Abi Wade. Here’s our pics – as usual, click to view large:

Fear of Men / Spectrum at The Dome

We’ve got two Fear of Men related things to write about today, so we thought we’d wrap them up in one handy blog post.

Luna

First is more info on their new single Luna, which we first posted about a fortnight ago. Art is Hard records, who are putting out the release on April 7th, describe the format as a Flexizine: a 20 page A5 fanzine – Fear of Men Quarterly – and a 7″ flexidisc. We put up the audio of A-side Luna with our earlier post on the single, and yesterday the b-side Outrun Me was premiered in the Guardian’s music section, which we can share with you now. The Luna Flexizine can be pre-ordered from the Art is Hard website.

The single Luna precedes Fear of Men’s debut album Loom by a fortnight. The Brighton launch takes place on 15th April at the Dome Studio Theatre (formerly the Pavilion Theatre) at a new night being held called Spectrum (formerly Source New Music).

Spectrum

With Source Magazine sadly retiring from it’s physical form, Brighton Dome have taken the opportunity to revitalise their new music project. As well as the new name, they’ve got a new partner in Resident record shop, and they’re also expanding the scope of what they do. Spectrum Live replaces the monthly music nights that they put on, which always had great line ups. On top of that there’s also Spectrum Seminars, which will give local musicians to learn more about the industry, Spectrum Site & Sound which will offer the opportunity for musicians to collaborate with film makers to create something within the Dome complex, and Spectrum Residencies which sees the Dome working with individual artists to develop their live act. We look forward to seeing how these develop over the coming months – no doubt there’ll be plenty of blog from us along the way.

Source New Music gallery – Traams & Teardrop Factory

Last night we went along to the Brighton Dome Source New Music Night, but for one reason or the other we didn’t get along quite as early as we’d hoped, so we missed Last Heir and Cousin. We did get lots of photos of the other two acts – Teardrop Factory and last months Source cover stars Traams – and here they are.

(as usual, click on the pics to view large)

Weekend Gig Picks

We’re going to kick off this week’s round up of the best local gigs with probably the fastest selling out local gig of recent times. Nick Cave may have been born in Australia, but he’s been a Brighton Resident for many years, and this Thursday he brings his Bad Seeds to Brighton Dome as part of their Push The Sky Away tour. If you didn’t manage to get a Nick Cave ticket and fancy some live music tomorrow night, then Physics House Band are supporting Jaga Jazzist at the Old Market.

LETOn Friday night a couple of regular Brighton live music nights have got some great line ups. At the Blind Tiger, Les Enfants Terribles have Tigercub headlining, alongside Plasticine, Great Pagans and Skirts, and then later on at Sticky Mikes Late Night Lingerie have a bill consisting of Spit Shake Sisters, The Querelles, Vyypers, Thee MVPs and Slagcan.

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Sticking with regular nights, Saturday is the next Source New Music night at the Dome Studio Theatre. Recent Source cover stars Traams headline – technically they’re not a Brighton band (they’re from Chichester), but they are signed to Brighton label FatCat, they do play most of their gigs here, and they are a fantastic live band. Support comes from Teardrop Factory, Cousin and Last Heir. Saturday is also Oxjam Brighton day, where for a five pound wrist band you can see dozens of bands all over town at different locations, kicking off from 12 o clock. Full line up details are on the flyer below – our picks are BentCousin, who will be playing at the Seven Stars at 6.30, and Fragile Creatures on at 9pm at the Hobgoblin.

oxjam

The Levellers, Electric Soft Parade and McDermott’s Two Hours at the Dome

On Friday Night The Levellers played a one-off sell out gig at Brighton Dome to celebrate twenty five years as a band. Support came from two other acts who’ve collaborated with The Levellers over the years – Electric Soft Parade, who played a set taken from their new album Idiots, and McDermott’s Two Hours who were originally a band who inspired The Levellers but who the Levellers went on to produce. We took our camera along to capture a permanent record of a timeless night.

Click on the images to view large:

Source New Music – Clowns, Evil Son and Wildcat Strike

Thursday night was the last Source New Music of the year, and the last for a few months until they return in February 2013 – like Source Magazine, the night is taking a well earned break in January.

Wildcat Strike

Wildcat Strike

I arrived midway through Wildcat Strike’s set, which I was quite enjoying – really rather good post / math rock, nice and tight – and then the vocals came in. I say vocals, it was just shouting. Not exclamations of anger or any other emotion, just shouting. It’s a shame because aside from the vocals, Wildcat strike were really tight and made a fantastic sound.

The Evil Son

The Evil Son

Next up were Evil Son, who we saw a few weeks ago at their EP launch at the Albert. We got a similar show: tight, spiky alternative guitar pop – let’s use the word grunge, because they do – but louder, and with better lights. There’s nothing to fault musically with Evil Son – the songs are well written and it’s obvious that each member of the band oozes talent – bassist Pepe Le Moko also plays bass for David Gedge’s Wedding Present. They’re the kind of band who you could enjoy even if grunge wasn’t your thing because what they do they do so well.

Clowns

Clowns

As much as I enjoyed The Evil Son (and the bits of Wildcat Strike when they weren’t shouting), the floor was wiped clean with the night’s headliners Clowns, who provided a masterclass on showmanship. A sharply dressed Miles Heathfield spent the set prowling the stage and the front few rows of the audience, with a taut muscular musical backing from the three other clowns. If you wanted an example of what to look for in a great frontman, Miles was it. No standing still trying to hide behind the microphone stand. No danger of being distracted by anything other than what was going on on stage. The start of the band’s set was deceptively quiet, with things soon turning around to show their true colours – loud, alternative rock. After a full set of their own material they return for an encore of a cover of Ghost Town by The Specials. The level of engagement from Clowns, their intensity, their energy, the volume all contributed to them being worthy headliners. Next year, Clowns will be releasing their album Macho Bimbo on Bleeding Hearts Recordings, and we can’t wait.

Brighton Source New Music November 2012 – The Miserable Rich’s last ever gig (for now)

The format of the Source New Music Night changed a little bit this month, with the team at the Dome doing their very best to make sure that we all get to enjoy as much music as possible. Gone is the acoustic act in the bar downstairs, who never really got the appreciation they deserved, and instead a new mini stage was built to the side of the room. There’s still four acts, with the headliner hand-picked by The Source, and this they brought us the Miserable Rich’s last ever gig. For now at least – the band have decided that after five years they’re going to take some well earned time off.

If you got there early, you would have been lucky enough to have caught Ingrid Plum, who played a short set at 8pm. I say played, but Ingrid’s only instrument was her voice, singing her own acapella songs (and one by local legend Chris T-T), in the traditional unaccompanied folk style. It was a performance that captivated the room – a mean for the first act on!

Ingrid Plum

Ingrid Plum

Next up, on the other side of the room on their new stage was Donna Fullman. We wrote about her album Inner World back in July, and have been kicking ourselves that we haven’t made it up to the Bull in Ditchling for one of her Sunday Night sessions, because Donna and her band’s set was lovely – a handful catchy, smooth folk pop songs.

Donna Fullman

Donna Fullman

Third act Cate Ferris has played Source New Music before, November last year, but back then she was the acoustic act downstairs who not nearly enough people saw. This time around she won over a whole room full of people who packed out the place for their last chance to see The Miserable Rich. What Cate does is nothing short of astonishing, using loops to build up beautifully told songs, and making it look effortless while doing so. And just when that’s impressed you, there’s the amazing voice. I’ve seen Cate many times over the last few years, and I reckon this is the best time I’ve ever seen her – the big stage really suited her. Next time, I reckon she’ll be the headliner.

Cate Ferris

Cate Ferris

Friday night was a special night not only for The Miserable Rich, but also for their fans, who had come from far and wide to see them for one last time. The songs they played were very much the crowd-pleasers – I lost count of the number of times I heard the words “this one’s my favourite” as I was angling to get a better photo. Tracks came from throughout their five year career, and they were re-joined by original guitarist Jim Briffett for some tracks. It wouldn’t have been right if there wasn’t alcohol involved and James was drinking whisky like it was water, and by the last song before the encore it was affecting his recall for lyrics. I guess he won’t need to be remembering them for a bit though! The night was closed was the band playing acoustically in amongst the audience – a magical moment to end this chapter of the Miserable Rich’s musical career.

The Miserable Rich

The Miserable Rich

Catherine Ireton / Treasure Tracks #4

This Saturday saw Catherine Ireton’s fourth and final Treasure Tracks gig. Her previous mystery excursions have involved a little bit of a hunt, but this time around we really were sent on a wild goose chase, not only to get hold of tickets but also to get to the final location.

The first clue was a picture posted online of the red phone boxes on Trafalgar Street, with a number to dial. I went to the phone boxes – one was out of order, the other only accepted credit cards, neither smelled great. I stepped out into the fresh air to dial the number only to get a recorded message telling me to look up for the first clue. That sent me off to one of two record shops to hunt down a Prince album which contained the next clue. The onto Resident where the final clue could be exchanged for a ticket to the gig, which just told me to turn up to the George IV statue at 8.15 on Friday night…

Fast forward to a cold drizzly night, and a group of around twenty or thirty people congregate near the North End of Pavilion Gardens. The event was put on in conjunction with Source New Music, and Bex – who introduces their regular evenings (and does all the hard work pulling most of it together) – popped up to lead us to the location of the concert. Through the stage door round the back of the Dome, down some stairs and through some 17th century tunnels (which now lead off to dressing rooms). Then back up some stairs, past a rarely used museum entrance, and somehow into the bar at the Dome, where we stop off to buy a drink before being led through the Corn Exchange and into their foyer area where a stage had been set up and Catherine and her two accompanying musicians were waiting.

It was only a few weeks ago that we saw Catherine play a full gig at the Green Door Store. All of her treasure tracks gigs have felt a little bit more special than that, playing to friends rather than an audience, to people who are willing to make that little bit extra effort to find out about the gig, and consequently Catherine was a little more relaxed. The songs were the same, but they benefited from the intimacy. The set included all of the Treasure Tracks given away so far – Synapses, given away after the Booth Museum gig, Invisibility Disguise, from the Brighton Model Railway club gig, and Pieces of You from her webcast – as well as a selection other tracks, culminating in the last track that was sent through – This One’s Gonna Make Me Some Money – tying in nicely with the gig being held in the Corn Exchange.

Although this was the last Treasure Tracks gig, there are more plans for interesting gigs in intimate locations. Keep your eyes peeled for something in the Theatre Royal in the new year…