Brighton Rocks #31 : Lau Ro from Wax Machine

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What’s the best thing about Brighton?
Brighton seems to attract very interesting characters. I’ve met all sorts of crazy people here, that’s the best part for me.

Who are the your favourite local bands?
Off the top of my head I’d say Rokurokubi, Hill, Woody Green, Codex Serafini, Count Kujo, Strange Cages, Oh Mama, Jouis…
There’s also a great new upcoming project called ‘Anona’ to keep an eye out for.

What’s the best venue?
The Rialto Theatre is quite an interesting space and we’ve had some great nights there. The Hope and Ruin has good sound too. I reckon anywhere Acid Box or Melting Vinyl go for 🙂

What’s the best rehearsal space / studio?
Brighton Electric is cool and they got good gear. But we don’t have much money so we usually jam/rehearse in a mysterious dark and damp cave under a bridge.

What’s the best club?
Mmm I don’t really go to clubs. Been to some good Eight Miles High club nights and I’d definitely recommend the Sidereal Ziggurat if you wanna have a boogie or freakout.

What’s the best record shop?
Resident seems to have its finger on the pulse of local music and more.. One day I hope to have the necessary funds to buy more records.

Where’s the best places to eat?
Izzi and I treated ourselves to breakfast at Brewed this morning. But basically anywhere in the Lanes or around the Open Market.

What’s the best pub?
I don’t go to pubs very often but I’d say The Great Eastern or White Rabbit.

Who’s your favourite Brighton celebrity?
Apparently Aleister Crowley had his funeral here, I like to think that I can feel his presence when walking around Woodvale.

When was the last time you had any Brighton Rock?
Never!

Earthsong of Silence by Wax Machine is out on Friday 20th March. It’s available to order through the bandcamp link below, or via Resident.

At the time of writing, there’s a launch party at the Hope & Ruin on 21st March, but keep an eye on the Facebook event for updates.

Brighton Rocks #30 : Paul Pascoe from Beat Hotel

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What’s the best thing about Brighton?
The best thing about living in Brighton and Hove has to be the sea. I’m from Plymouth originally and although that city definitely doesn’t have any kind of cheery seaside vibe, it is close to all the amazing beaches of South Devon and Cornwall. When I reached my early 20s and decided to make good my escape, I couldn’t imagine living very far from the sea. That may be the only reason I’m here, now I think about it?! Peace Statue to the Lagoon is my happy place. The uncool Hove bit. Continue reading

Brighton Rocks #28 : Penelope Isles

We first approached Penelope Isles about doing a Brighton Rocks with us back in June but as we’ve been told my multiple people, they’re the hardest working band in town, so the post is only finally going up now. Their album Until The Tide Creeps In came out on Bella Union back in July and the band have been on tour pretty much all this year, most recently supporting the Flaming Lips and playing at British Sea Power’s Krankenhaus festival. Next week they kick off a headline worldwide tour, starting with Europe, then North America, then Europe again and back to the UK culminating in a headline gig at the Haunt on 11th December

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What’s the best thing about Brighton?
Hill Top Cafe. A regular stop for us on our way outa town! Continue reading

Brighton Rocks #27 : BUNKR

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What’s the best thing about Brighton?
It’s hard to single out one particular thing, so I’ll be a cop out and list a few. The merry month of May for the Brighton Festival, Fringe and The Great Escape. The thriving live music scene. The general feeling of acceptance. The surrounding Sussex countryside. And of course the seagulls (the birds, not the football team) – they’re the true keepers of
the city. Continue reading

Brighton Rocks #26 : Steve Ellis from Andres Y Xavi

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What’s the best thing about Brighton?
The sea. I love living here because I get to look at the sea every day – I can see it from my bed – how amazing is that! I grew up in north London and seeing the sea was very much restricted to holidays and rare day trips (I came down here for the first time on a Network Day when, as a kid, you could buy a rail ticket anywhere in Network Southeast for £1) but always in summer and mostly when the weather wasn’t too bad. I had no idea then that the sea has so many different faces, so many moods: when it’s rough and dark and full of foreboding it’s a delight to get up close to; when it’s calm and peaceful and blue it’s nice to look at from a distance. I can sit and watch and listen to the waves for hours and our album reflects that a little! Continue reading